Don’t let your child go down the “Summer Slide”

Have you ever heard of the “summer slide”? Well, if you thought a new ride at Cedar Point or a new dance like I did, that’s not it. The “summer slide” is when children who come from low-income households which are typically black and brown children start to lose a lot of the academic gains especially in reading while children who come from middle to high income households make academic gains. Unfortunately, by the fifth grade this summer slide leaves children from low-income families 2 or 3 years behind children from high-income families. Now, I know you are wondering how could this happen especially since in the summer all kids are out of school regardless of their economic background. The dismal reality is most children whose families cannot afford summer reading or math camps, or they aren’t able to go on enriching summer vacations, or they simply don’t have enough healthy foods to eat and books to read these are just a few of the  things that contribute to the “summer slide.” Now that we all are aware of what the “summer slide” is it’s time for us to prevent it from happening.

 

Here are 5 Great ways we can combat the “summer slide”

 

  1. Take your children to the library once a week. I started off with the library because it is free and they have tons of resources for your child. Most libraries if not all have summer reading programs,  information on different activities that are going on throughout the summer in your area, and of course books. Remember you want your children to be exposed to books as much as possible especially in the summer.

 

  1. Have a scavenger outside. This is cool because they help build your child’s problem-solving skills and they are also getting plenty of sunshine at the same time. Click on the link Scavenger Hunt Fun so you can get all types of scavenger hunt ideas.

 

  1. Let your child find a delicious recipe and take turns reading the ingredients as you are cooking together. This idea is really awesome because first you are letting them be in charge of something and you are also doing shared reading and guess what math is involved because of all of the measuring you will be doing together.

 

  1. Play I spy games a lot. This is a great way to develop and strengthen your child’s listening, speaking and critical thinking skills. For example, when you’re outside you could say I spy with my little eye something tall with green at the top and brown on the bottom they may naturally guess a tree but,  actually you were referring to the truck across the street from your house.

 

  1. You and your child take turns picking a different location for you to read to them before bed. This one should be really fun and exciting because you really can get creative. For example, you could make a tent or a fortress using sheets and blankets, then grab your flashlight and your favorite book. Let your child come in your room and they could read you a story before bed.

 

As you can see these are just a few ideas that could help us defeat that “summer slide” so,  if you have any ideas please share them on my comment section I would love to hear about your ideas.

 

 

Image result for image of words summer slide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Author:

Hi my name Sasha Beckette-Abdullah and I am the owner of ABC LEARN, and the Founder/Director of ABC READ, INC which is a 501c3 tax-deductible non-profit organization. ABC LEARN was started when I began helping my nieces by tutoring them in reading then, I started helping children get prepared for kindergarten in 2009 which involved a lot of getting them reading ready. Finally, I decided in 2013 to go back to my roots and start focusing solely on tutoring children in reading who are in Pre-kindergarten-third grade and helping to motivate children to want to read. It's been so wonderful being able to do something that I love so much while at the same time providing a service that is much needed in our community.

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